Day 13: Submit your post-prints

Day13_NOVAToday, we’ll expand on self-archiving your articles to cover how you can make your author final version manuscripts or ‘post-prints’ fully available online.

NOVA: accessible, searchable, and discoverable

We’ve been talking a lot about how Open Access leads to increased exposure of your research and benefits your impact. And rightly so, it’s a sure way of doing this. Now we’re going to look at how you can take advantage of NOVA, UON’s dedicated Open Access digital repository. NOVA is a research repository, so we’re looking at material of a scholarly nature. Have a look at a more detailed list of what material is appropriate for inclusion in NOVA.

We’ve been talking a lot about how Open Access leads to increased exposure of your research and benefits your impact. And rightly so, it’s a sure way of doing this. Now we’re going to look at how you can take advantage of NOVA, UON’s dedicated Open Access digital repository. NOVA is a research repository, so we’re looking at material of a scholarly nature. Have a look at a more detailed list of what material is appropriate for inclusion in NOVA.

Below is an example of a journal article that has been made available full-text through the deposit of a post-print. All the metadata for the record is present, together with its unique, persistent identifier, known as a ‘handle,’ (e.g. http://hdl.handle.net/1959.13/1311905) but the presence of the attachment at bottom-left is what we’re really talking about here. This means the article can be downloaded as full-text by anybody, regardless of where they are. No need for expensive subscriptions. No need for institutional affiliation. More readers = more impact.

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Publication versions: pre-print, post-print and publisher

Now that we’ve got you thinking about getting more of your work available Open Access and full-text in NOVA, the next thing to look at is the different versions of your publication. Think about the life-cycle of a publication: different stages of its life can be made full-text in repositories like NOVA, depending on copyright policy. The copyright policy of who you publish with determines what version of your publication might be able to be made available.   We understand this has the potential to be very confusing, so here’s a summary of these stages so we’re on the same page:

Pre-print: this is the bare-bones version of your publication. Think of it as the ‘working’ version. The main thing we need to know here is that this is the version before peer-review and it lacks the authority and robustness of a peer-reviewed journal. Some publishers do allow these versions to be published to repositories, however NOVA does not utilise them, so we’re going to concentrate on the next version – the one that has the capacity to make the most difference for you and your research.

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Post-print: You’ll note from this image of a post-print article that it looks pretty much like a word document, which is indeed what it is. The big difference between pre- and post-prints is that this one is the version after peer review; it therefore incorporates changes made in the peer-review process.

Post-prints are therefore exactly the same as full published versions content-wise. The only difference is they do not include a publisher’s formatting, logos or pagination.

Crucially though, it’s the version before publication, which means it can be deposited and archived in repositories like NOVA as full-text – depending on copyright and any embargo periods.

Embargos are a definite draw-back, but if you think about Open Access after a delay or Open Access not at all, we’re sure you’ll agree that the wait will be worth it.

You’ll look at publishers who allow post-prints in today’s homework.

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Publisher version: this is a publisher version of an article. It’s the final stage in your publications life-cycle. The ‘official’ version, if you like. The problem with these versions is that many publishers will not allow them to be deposited in repositories, which means that unless you’re the author, you’ve got a subscription to the journal, or you’ve got the advantage of some other kind of institutional subscription, you won’t be able to access this. For you, that really limits who can read your work and, therefore, who may cite your work.

You can see that this version differs from the post-print in the way it’s formatted and also by the publisher’s logo – its stamp of ownership.

We learned in yesterday’s challenge that some publishers have Open Access models that mean their versions can be made full text in repositories like NOVA. In this case the NOVA team will have ensured this version is attached to the publication when it is published to the repository.

Homework: deposit your post-print

Step1: Think of some journal articles you’ve published over the last few years and search Sherpa/Romeo for the publisher’s copyright policy. You can search by title, publisher, keyword or ISSN. If you have the ISSN this will be the quickest route to what we’re looking for.

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You can see that for this journal the publisher allows the post-print to be archived. Search Sherpa/Romeo until you find a journal you’ve published in that gives you a green tick against post-print. Also look to see whether you can archive the publisher’s version PDF!

Not all journals are indexed by Sherpa/Romeo, so if you can’t find yours, don’t despair. UON has a team of people experienced in navigating the stormy seas of copyright:

Contact the NOVA support team: nova@newcastle.edu.au

Contact the Copyright Officer: copyright@newcastle.edu.au

Step 2: Once you’ve identified that you can use the post-print version, you need to locate the post-print of the article itself. Do you make a habit out of archiving these versions? If so, it should be easy. If you’re having trouble maybe try any co-authors. It has to out there somewhere!

Step3: Submit your post-print version to NOVA to begin the publishing process. There’s two ways to go about this. But before you do anything you should search NOVA to see whether or not your article already has a metadata (not full-text) record in the repository.

On the NOVA landing page select browse across the header.

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Search by either the title of your article or by your name. The title search option is by far the most direct way, but you might also like to have a look at which of your work is already in NOVA.

If you do locate your article in the results, unless you’ve already submitted your post-print what you’ll see is a metadata only record. You can now increase the visibility of this article exponentially by submitting your post-print and make it fully accessible. To do this email your post-print to nova@newcastle.edu.au and the repository team will begin the process of making your article available full-text. They may ask you a question or two more but at this point we’re almost there.

If you don’t locate your article in your NOVA search, the metadata record is yet to be published. If this is the case you can definitely still email your post-print but you’ll speed up the process by completing the Nova Resource Deposit Form. Don’t forget to attach your post-print. Once you’ve submitted your article you’ll receive an automated receipt for your reference. Make sure you keep this as it can be used in any further correspondence with the NOVA team. Once the deposit is complete expect to hear back from the team – they’ll either give you the good news or advise on any embargo period applicable.

If you experience any problems submitting or if you have any questions, contact the Research Repository Manager: vicki.picasso@newcastle.edu.au.

We covered a lot of ground today, I know! But it’ll be worth it. Today’s activity may have been to submit one journal article post-print, but keep this process in mind and, in the future, submit as many post-prints as you can.

The NOVA team will be able to provide you with expert advice on which post-prints of yours can be made available – including conference papers, and to a lesser extent, book chapters. Building a healthy relationship with NOVA is one sure-fire way to increasing the visibility of your research.

Tomorrow: ORCID identifiers to collect and claim your articles, datasets, and more.

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